My Experience With Nature

Blue-winged teal Riding Mountain National Park

Blue-winged teal swims in marsh pothole

My name is Amanda Walker and I am from Minnedosa Collegiate in Manitoba (Canada) spending the day learning about Earth Rhythms for a Career Preparation course with my school. Today, I had the pleasure to view the nature  and wonderful sights of Riding Mountain National Park. I spent the day with Earth Rhythms president, Celes Davar. This afternoon Celes took me on a wild adventure as we toured the wonderful park, and on our way we were gifted by seeing many of Manitoba’s wildlife citizens. We saw many birds such as “Ring-necked ducks”, “Green-Winged Teals”, “Great Blue Herons”, and Canada Geese, a sight for everyone to enjoy.

Canada goose on nest_Riding Mountain National Park

Female Canada goose hides on nest

Our day made me understand a lot more about nature and appreciate all that beauty Manitoba has to offer. For example, we viewed many of the ponds that surround the park and took time to discover the wildlife among them. I realize that even on a cloudy day in April, Manitoba still has so much to show for itself and that shouldn’t be taken for-granted by anyone; especially those who are honored to live here.

I realized that you can return here many times, seeing wildlife in new places and under different lighting conditions. For example, the evening light on a white-tailed deer feeding in early spring is a site that is quite common within the park.

-By Amanda Walker, Minnedosa Collegiate

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The first migrants are arriving

Without a doubt, spring has arrived. Not because the length of daily sunlight is much longer; not because it is warmer; not because we’ve passed the vernal equinox….but, more rhythmically and seasonal, is the arrival of returning migrant birds.

Canada Geese, a kestrel (small falcon) and today, two Dark-eyed juncos..one of which was a beautiful Oregon phase coloration.

I get really excited when I see returning migrants. We’ve turned the corner and whether spring is cool, short, long, or warm and full of sunshine, I feel the season of spring upon us. Returning migrants are somewhat like friends returning after a long separation…and, I love it!

Wildlife in the Riding Mountain sanctuary

 

Canada Geese, Onanole, Manitoba

Canada Geese, Onanole, Manitoba

Having a national park in your backyard is a great thing.  First of all, it’s good quality water that flows out to neighboring areas.  The seasonal changes take on a character and rhythm that flows with the wild birds and mammals that migrate or move in and out of the park.  People who live here, love the fact that land is affordable and that they have access to a wide range of recreational pursuits that are climate friendly (walking, hiking, biking, birding, kayaking, canoeing, snowshoeing, skiing) all year long.

 

Today, as I was traveling up to Dauphin along the Riding Mountain parkway, I saw a peregrine falcon, photographed a young moose having several deep drinks at a roadside lick, observed various waterfowl (red-necked grebe, mallard, golden-eye), and had a great chance to see some Canada Geese waddling around in a marsh.

My two favorite seasons are spring – the beautiful returning birds, and fall – the deep resonant sounds of fall courtship of elk and moose.  Right now, we are all looking forward to a warm spring and a hot summer.  I, for one, am really happy to see wildlife in our sanctuary, Riding Mountain National Park.

Young moose watchful at a mineral lick

Young moose watchful at a mineral lick